Sunday, March 8, 2009

The California Doctrine

A recent article in the Economist chronicles the shift in the political power to leftist Democrats from California. With the House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and power committee chairmen Henry Waxman and George Miller hailing from the Golden State, it is easy to fathom how Californian dogmas pervade the political discussion. Senators Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer, both hailing from the ultra-liberal San Francisco Bay Area, command powerful as chairs of the Committee on Intelligence and the Environment and Public Works Committee, respectively. The Democrats ascension to power has been empowered by a clamoring for change, but the centrist values of the majority of Americans is unlikely to be represented by this powerful group of politicians.

Despite rhetoric that professes support for the middle class, Democrats from California have historically enacted legislation that maintains the status quo of the landed elite. By disguising their agenda though laws that ostensibly designed to protect the environment or the rights of workers, they have succeeded in drastically raising the cost of living in California while driving out the types of jobs that enable ascension of the socioeconomic ladder. As a result, middle class families flee the state every year in search of better jobs and a more affordable lifestyle, leaving only the wealthy elite and their lower class service workers. Many of these service workers are immigrants, often illegal, living packed in substandard dwellings far from the extravagant locales of their employers. The politicians of California vigorously fight to maintain their low cost immigrant workforce to ensure their wealthy supporters have a steady supply of cheap, dependable labor.

Many of the state’s most powerful politicians are entrenched in the wealthy elite, hailing from Beverly Hills, Pacific Heights, and San Francisco. They are vested in developing a society of a sophisticated upper class and their economically dependent servants, much as the wealthy plantation owners used their power and influence to perpetuate slavery. The politicians enact laws that create such stringent environmental and regulatory barriers that the cost of doing business becomes astronomical. This drives typical middle class jobs out of the state and makes it prohibitively expensive to young families to survive, let alone advance their position, in California. The lower class (which subsides on the generous welfare disseminated by the state) and the immigrants (which are enabled by the lax immigration enforcement by police officers) are indebted to the wealthy elite for their survival.

Now that the Californian leftists have seized control of Congress and wrestled power away from their party’s poster-boy President, they will attempt, through their positions of power and influence, to dictate the agenda and disseminate their social constructivism throughout the nation. Their stringent environmental laws and punitive business legislation will strangle the life out of our fragile economy. The current unemployment rate across California tops 10%, but the policies promoted by these politicians could easily drive unemployment much higher. It is the middle class that suffers most when unemployment rises as the wealthy elite can tap their vast financial resources to survive the rough times. The assault on the middle class has not ended with the election of President Obama. On the contrary, the worst is yet to come.

2 comments:

worldsbesttrader said...

yo... even the worldsbesttrader is havin' a hell of a time tryin to get paid in this place. Love the article. I'm feelin the pain. I wanna be a limousine liberal too, the only thing I'm missing is the limousine. Get me there, btm.

Jobs for America said...

The way you build a successful society is to provide opportunities for hard working people to pull themselves up (as China is doing), not just opportunities for the rich to get richer. That isn't accomplished by spending tons of taxpayer money or just giving more and more benefits to people, but by fostering economic growth, hard work, and ingenuity.

See Andy Grove's article on Bloomberg